Finish Your Educational Journey Here

Have you started your educational journey at a local community college? Are you looking to transition this journey to a four-year school? The New Dimensions program at Albertus Magnus is the place for you! With our easily accessible locations in East Hartford and New Haven, flexible class schedules, and dedicated staff, we are here to make the transition as smooth as possible for you.

Sonny Le, one of our current students in our New Dimensions Program at our East Hartford campus, shares his experience transitioning from a community college to Albertus Magnus College.

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What made you choose Albertus Magnus College/New Dimensions?

Sonny: Well, I currently work a full-time job and needed something that could fit into my busy schedule. The New Dimensions Program at Albertus Magnus College was highly recommended by my co-workers and I love the set-up of having class once a week, on one specific day, from 6 to 10 p.m.

What was your biggest concern about transferring?

Sonny: I had been out of school for a while! I knew I was rusty and was coming back to school to finish my degree as an older adult. I was nervous as to whether or not I could actually do it. Enrolling in the New Dimensions Program really alleviated my fears though, as I would soon find out that most of my classmates were in the same boat as me.

What stood out to you during the Admissions process?

Sonny: The admissions counselors were a tremendous help and were key to this process. As said above, I was nervous about coming back to school full-time and my admissions counselor was there every step of the way. They helped calm my nerves, and patiently walked me through the process of the New Dimensions Program, keeping in touch throughout the whole thing!

How could we have improved the transition for you?

Sonny: Honestly? Nothing. I know with working full-time, and having other commitments, that I was a little slower than I should have been with getting all my requirements completed. But, with all the support and guidance from my admissions counselor, we were able to get it completed on time, together.

What advice would you give to other students looking to transfer?

Sonny: Don’t be nervous! It’s a big step, but it is definitely worth it. I have been in class for about six months now and am 100% happy that I chose the New Dimensions Program at Albertus. The support there is tremendous, both in and out of the classroom and they believe in your success.

If you are interested in finding out more about our New Dimensions Program, click here to discover the program and register to an Open House!

 

Raising Awareness of Domestic Violence

“This October, let us honor National Domestic Violence Awareness Month by promoting peace in our own families, homes, and communities. Let us renew our commitment to end domestic violence – in every city, every town, and every corner of America.”

Presidential Proclamation declaring October 2013 Domestic Violence Prevention Month

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Nearly 20 years after the passage of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) domestic violence remains an often hidden problem in our communities. People we interact with every day may be experiencing domestic violence without us knowing it. According to the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence:

  • In 2009, violent crimes by intimate partners (current or former spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend) accounted for 26 percent of non-fatal crimes against females and 5 percent against males.
  • Of female murder victims in 2009, 35 percent were killed by an intimate partner.
  • Fifteen percent of teens who have been in a relationship report having been hit, slapped or pushed by their boyfriend or girlfriend.

This tearing down not only hurts individuals, it limits entire communities as those who are victimized may be prevented from reaching their full and vibrant potential.

Every day in Connecticut, dedicated social workers, counselors, criminal investigators and social service agencies work to prevent and end domestic violence. On September 30, 2013, more than 200 of them came together to attend Beyond the Bruises: A Conference on Psychological Abuse and Stalking hosted by The Umbrella Center for Domestic Violence Services, a program of BH Care. Albertus Magnus College was proud to help sponsor this event and is committed to providing professionals with the tools and education they need to best serve their community.Susan De Leon-Dr.Mazen-Carin - Roseann More

Each year, The Umbrella Center for Domestic Violence Services assists over 9,000 victims and their children in 19 cities and towns in the lower Naugatuck Valley, Greater New Haven and Shoreline communities. Conference attendees shared best regional practices and gained new knowledge from keynote speakers and national authorities, including bestselling author and renowned journalist, Leslie Morgan Steiner. Dr. Ragaa Mazen, Director of the Albertus Masters of Science in Human Servicesprogram met one-on-one with attendees to share local Human Services program insights.

Albertus Magnus College has a total enrollment of 1,700 students. It offers 50 traditional undergraduate programs, accelerated undergraduate programs for working adults, and graduate programs in business, management, education, liberal studies, leadership, writing, human services and art therapy. The College also offers a degree in Criminal Justice and Addiction Counseling Certificate.

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Cultivating Exemplary Leadership Part Two

The following excerpt is derived from the forthcoming manuscript, “Lead Me Out to the Ballgame:  Stories and Strategies to Develop Major League Leadership,” which is being written by Dr. Howard Fero and his colleague, Dr. Rebecca Herman.  The work is based on more than 100 interviews, conducted with current and former Major League Baseball players and managers. To follow their progress, their research, and to discuss baseball and leadership, please ‘like’ their Facebook page.

“I don’t care how long you’ve been in this game or what kind of success you’ve had in this game; every day you have to gain their trust, and every day you have to gain their respect.”

Davey Johnson, as Manager of the Washington Nationals

RESPECT

Respect … it is hard to hear or read that word without a vision of Aretha Franklin belting it out; it is something that we all seem to crave and sometimes wonder if we will ever earn enough of it.  As Aretha said, we need to “find out what it means to me,” and to us, even more significant, is finding out what it means to the organization or team as a whole.  How does a manager having the respect of his players impact their commitment and play?  How does a player having the respect of his manager impact the team?  And how does respecting your organization impact the work that you do?  Rodney Dangerfield spent his career proclaiming, “I get no respect,” and as you read ahead, think about the respect you get, the respect you give, and the impact it has on the players in your life.

RESPECT THE POSITION

There is a basic notion when discussing leadership that people follow others who have power. This concept, however, needs a little explanation in that power does not and should not come from a people’s positions alone, but should come from who they are and what they do. The power should come from the person, not the position.  It’s true, as Ned Yost, manager of the KC Royals pointed out, “when you become a manager, right off the bat you garner respect because you’re a manager.”  This is the positional power we mentioned above, and a power that many people throughout the world rely upon.  This type of power, however, only goes so far.  As Yost continues, “you’ve got to earn that ‘respect’ every single day.”  We may get a person’s respect from our position initially, but we will either keep it or lose it depending on our actions once we are there. Following a leader or a manager solely because one is in charge will take us far enough to avoid getting reprimanded or far enough to do a good job.  Following people because we respect them and what they stand for will bring us to levels of performance that will lead to greater personal and in turn greater organizational success.

THE RIGHT FIT

What’s important to point out in regard to respecting the manager (or for that matter, respecting the players, the team, or the game in general) is that the first step in cultivating a culture of respect is putting together a team comprised of people with not only the ability to hit a ball, make a play, or throw strikes, but a team of people with a moral compass, a team of people who have drive and character, a team of people who want to be there and will do what is necessary to support the team as a whole. Talent is important, but fit is vital.  We as leaders need to, as Jim Collins points out, “start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats” (Collins, 2001).

EARN IT

The task of cultivating the respect of his players, as a Major League manager must do, is not any different from earning the respect of an employee or a colleague in any organization, so how does one do this? Well, to borrow a line from the Smith Barney commercials and John Houseman from the 1980s, “he earns it!”  Sean Burroughs, who we spoke to when he was a member of the Minnesota Twins, pointed to honesty and openness as two of the things which lead him to respecting his managers. A manager needs to be honest with his players about their position on the team, what is expected to them, and what they need to do to succeed.  They need to be “true to their word, and true to what they preach.”  As infielder Eric Hosner of the Kansas City Royals told us, “the players notice that, and then ‘they’ gain a lot more respect.”

A CULTURE OF RESPECT

Having respect for the manager, having a manager who respects his or her people, having respect for the organization you work for, and having a respect for what you as an individual are doing…these ingredients together are what will bring out the best from the individual and in turn from the organization as a whole.  A culture of respect will lead to success on and off the field, in and out of the workplace, and with all those who see the individual and who he or she represents.

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Dr. Howard Fero with Washington Nationals Manager Davey Johnson.

Howard C. Fero, Ph.D.
The Leadership Doc
Director, Graduate Leadership Programs
Associate Professor of Business and Leadership
Albertus Magnus College

Dr. Huntitled2oward Fero, is an Associate Professor of Business and Leadership and the Director of Graduate Leadership programs at Albertus Magnus College. When not teaching classes and overseeing the Leadership programs at Albertus Dr. Fero uses his expertise to help individuals and organizations achieve optimal performance and effectiveness as The Leadership Doc. Dr. Fero will be blogging about different leadership topics throughout the year and speaks about these topics in his classes in the Master of and Arts in Leadership Master of Science in Management and Organizational Leadership Programs. He welcomes your comments and looks forward to communicating with you in our exciting new blog.